About

Welcome to the website for the exhibition, Woodrow Wilson, President Electric: Harnessing the Power of Innovation in the Progressive Era, recipient of the American Association for State and Local History’s 2012 Award of Merit. Using multimedia content, hands-on interactive experiences, and authentic artifacts, this traveling exhibition explores scientific and technological advances during the Progressive Era through the eyes of the first family. The exhibition is currently on view at the Woodrow Wilson House in Washington, DC through October 2012 and will travel to other venues during the centennial of Woodrow Wilson’s presidency (2012-2021). If you are interested in hosting the exhibition or would like more information please contact us.

Watch a video showcasing the exhibition’s many components

The exhibition is made up of six themed modules that explore advances in science and technology in the areas of communication, transportation, entertainment, household technology, wartime technology, and medicine.

The exhibition also incorporates several interactive components designed to promote hands-on learning. These include a period telephone, which visitors may use to listen to audio recordings of President Wilson’s speeches; a replica Victrola player, which visitors may use to play records from the era; a touch-screen kiosk featuring film footage of inventions at work; and a “You Be the President” experience in which visitors may test their speech making skills over a period radio set.

Online features available on this website include a Multimedia Timeline, featuring film and audio footage; the Decode Wilson’s Shorthand Game in which you can decode a message in Wilson’s shorthand to reveal hidden content; Teacher Resources designed to promote cross-disciplinary learning; and the President Electric Blog, where you can find news, polls, videos, and user submissions from people like you.

The exhibition, Woodrow Wilson, President Electric: Harnessing the Power of Innovation in the Progressive Era, is supported in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed on this website do not necessarily represent those of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Woodrow Wilson House would like to thank the National Trust for Historic Preservation and National Endowment for the Humanities for their support of this exhibition and its online programming.